7.4.8 Lab – Configure Server-Based Authentication with RADIUS Answers

7.4.8 Lab – Configure Server-Based Authentication with RADIUS Answers

7.4.8 Lab - Configure Server-Based Authentication with RADIUS Answers 2

Addressing Table

Device Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway Switch Port
R1 G0/0/0 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252 N/A N/A
R1 G0/0/1 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 N/A S1 F0/5
R2 G0/0/0 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252 N/A N/A
R2 G0/0/1 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.252 N/A N/A
R3 G0/0/0 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.252 N/A N/A
R3 G0/0/1 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 N/A S3 F0/5
PC-A NIC 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1 S1 F0/6
RADIUS Server on PC-A NIC 192.168.1.11 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1 N/A
PC-C NIC 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 S3 F0/18

Objectives

Part 1: Configure Basic Device Settings

Part 2: Configure Centralized Authentication Using AAA and RADIUS

  • Enable AAA.
  • Configure the default login authentication list.
  • Specify a RADIUS server.

Part 3: Configure Centralized Authentication Using AAA and RADIUS

  • Test the AAA RADIUS configuration.
  • Change the RADIUS port numbers

Background / Scenario

The most basic form of router access security is to create passwords for the console, vty, and aux lines. A user is prompted for only a password when accessing the router. Configuring a privileged EXEC mode secret password further improves security, but still only a basic password is required for each mode of access. Local databases with usernames with varying privilege levels can also be used and the users will be prompted for usernames and passwords to access the devices.

In addition to basic passwords and local authentication, additional control over the login process can be achieved using authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA). For basic authentication, AAA can be configured to access the local database for user logins, and fallback procedures can also be defined. However, this approach is not very scalable because it must be configured on every router. To take full advantage of AAA and achieve maximum scalability, AAA is used in conjunction with an external TACACS+ or RADIUS server database. When a user attempts to log in, the router references the external server database to verify that the user is logging in with a valid username and password.

In this lab, you build a multi-router network and configure the routers and hosts. You will access RADIUS software on an external computer and use AAA to authenticate users with the RADIUS server.

Note: The routers used with hands-on labs are Cisco 4221 with Cisco IOS XE Release 16.9.6 (universalk9 image). The switches used in the labs are Cisco Catalyst 2960+ with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(7) (lanbasek9 image). Other routers, switches, and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and the output produced might vary from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of the lab for the correct interface identifiers.

Note: Before you begin, ensure that the routers and the switches have been erased and have no startup configurations.

Required Resources

  • 3 Routers (Cisco 4221 with Cisco XE Release 16.9.6 universal image or comparable with a Security Technology Package license)
  • 2 Switches (Cisco 2960+ with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(7) lanbasek9 image or comparable)
  • 2 PCs (Windows OS with a terminal emulation application and virtualization software, such as VirtualBox installed)
  • 1 Security Workstation Virtual Machine with RADIUS server already installed
  • Console cables to configure Cisco networking devices
  • Ethernet cables as shown in the topology

Instructions

Part 1: Configure Basic Device Settings

In this part, you set up the network topology and configure basic settings, such as the interface IP addresses, static routing, device access, and passwords.

The initial router configurations are provided and the configurations for the switches are optional.

Step 1: Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram, and then cable as necessary.

Step 2: Load the configurations.

In this step, you will copy and paste the configurations into each router.

Router R1

enable
config terminal
no ip domain lookup
enable algorithm-type sha256 secret cisco12345
username user01 algorithm-type sha256 secret user01pass
username admin privilege 15 algorithm-type sha256 secret cisco12345
ip domain-name netsec.com
host R1
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
no shutdown
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
router ospf 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.2
line con 0
login local
logging synchronous
exec-timeout 5 0
line aux 0
login local
exec-timeout 5 0
line vty 0 4
login local
exec-timeout 5 0
transport input ssh
crypto key generate rsa general-key modulus 1024
end

Router R2

enable
config terminal
no ip domain lookup
host R2
enable algorithm-type sha256 secret cisco12345
username user01 algorithm-type sha256 secret user01pass
username admin privilege 15 algorithm-type sha256 secret cisco12345
ip domain-name netsec.com
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
no shutdown
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.252
no shutdown
router ospf 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.1.1
ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 10.2.2.1
line con 0
login local
logging synchronous
exec-timeout 5 0
line aux 0
login local
exec-timeout 5 0
line vty 0 4
login local
exec-timeout 5 0
transport input ssh
crypto key generate rsa general-key modulus 1024
end

Router R3

enable
config terminal
no ip domain lookup
enable algorithm-type sha256 secret cisco12345
username user01 algorithm-type sha256 secret user01pass
username admin privilege 15 algorithm-type sha256 secret cisco12345
ip domain-name netsec.com
host R3
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.252
no shutdown
interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
router ospf 1
passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0
network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.2.2.2
line con 0
login local
logging synchronous
exec-timeout 5 0
line aux 0
login local
exec-timeout 5 0
line vty 0 4
login local
exec-timeout 5 0
transport input ssh
crypto key generate rsa general-key modulus 1024
end
Step 3: Configure the PCs.

PC-A will function as the RADIUS server for this lab. A virtual machine with a RADIUS server is setup for use in this course. You can deploy the virtual machine on PC-A by following Lab – Installing the Virtual Machine if you have not done so already. You may choose to download, install, and configure a RADIUS server for your use if desired.

a. Assign the IP address and default gateway on PC-C according to the Addressing Table.

b. If you have not already deployed the virtual machine Security Workstation VM, please go back to Lab – Installing the Virtual Machine.

c. Start VirtualBox and verify that the Security Workstation is using the Bridged Adapter in the Network Settings.

d. Start the Security Workstation VM. Log into the VM as sec_admin with the password net_secPW. Select the user sec_admin from the dropdown list if necessary.

e. From the menu bar at the bottom of the Desktop, click Terminal Emulator.

f. Within the terminal emulator window, you will configure this virtual machine with an IP address of 192.168.1.11 by running a script. When prompted for a password, use the password net_secPW.

[[email protected] ~]$ cd ~/lab.support.files/scripts/
[[email protected] scripts]$ ./configure_as_static.sh
[sudo] password for sec_admin:
Configuing the NIC as:
IP: 192.168.1.11/24
GW: 192.168.1.1

IP Configuration successful.

g. Enter ip addr at the prompt to verify the assigned static IP address on Security Workstation VM.

[[email protected] scripts]$ ip addr
<output omitted>
2: eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc fq_codel state UP group
default qlen 1000
   link/ether 00:50:56:9c:c5:37 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
   inet 192.168.1.11/24 brd 192.168.1.255 scope global eth0
      valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
   inet6 fe80::250:56ff:fe9c:5248/64 scope link
      valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

h. Ping the gateway IP address (R1’s G0/0/0, 192.168.1.1) from Security Workstation VM.

[[email protected] scripts]$ ping -c 4 192.168.1.1
PING 192.168.1.1 (192.168.1.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.605 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.661 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.654 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=255 time=0.641 ms

--- 192.168.1.1 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3042ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.605/0.640/0.661/0.021 ms
Step 4: Verify connectivity.

a. Test connectivity by pinging from Security Workstation VM to PC-C. If the pings are not successful, troubleshoot the router and PC configurations until they are.

b. From Security Workstation VM terminal, establish an SSH session with R1 using the username user01 and password user01pass. Enter yes when prompted if you are sure you want to continue connecting.

[[email protected] scripts]$ ssh -l user01 192.168.1.1

c. Exit the SSH session when finished. Establish another SSH with R1 using the username admin and password cisco12345.

d. Exit the SSH session when finished. Now you have verified end-to-end connectivity and Security Workstation VM can communicate with router R1.

Part 2: Configure Centralized Authentication Using AAA and RADIUS

In this part, you will configure R1 to use AAA services to authenticate users. The RADIUS server is already configured with one user RadUser with the password RadUserpass and the secret shared key $trongKey.

Step 1: Enable AAA on R1.

Open a console on R1 and use the aaa new-model command in global configuration mode to enable AAA.

R1(config)# aaa new-model
Step 2: Configure the default login authentication list.

Configure the list to first use RADIUS for the authentication service, and then the fallback, none. If no RADIUS server can be reached and authentication cannot be performed, the router globally allows access without authentication. This is a safeguard measure in case the router starts up without connectivity to an active RADIUS server.

R1(config)# aaa authentication login default group radius none

Note: You could alternatively configure local authentication as the backup authentication method.

Note: If you do not set up a default login authentication list, you could get locked out of the router and need to use the password recovery procedure for your specific router.

Step 3: Specify a RADIUS server.

a. Use the radius server command to enter RADIUS server configuration mode.

R1(config)# radius server NetSec

b. Use the ? to view the sub-mode commands available for configuring a RADIUS server.

R1(config-radius-server)# ?
RADIUS server sub-mode commands:
  address          Specify the radius server address
  automate-tester  Configure server automated testing.
  backoff          Retry backoff pattern(Default is retransmits with constant
                   delay)
  exit             Exit from RADIUS server configuration mode
  key              Per-server encryption key
  no               Negate a command or set its defaults
  non-standard     Attributes to be parsed that violate RADIUS standard
  pac Protected    Access Credential key
  retransmit       Number of retries to active server (overrides default)
  timeout          Time to wait (in seconds) for this radius server to reply
                   (overrides default)

c. Use the address command to configure the IP address of the RADIUS server.

R1(config-radius-server)# address ipv4 192.168.1.11

d. The key command is used for the secret password that is shared between the RADIUS server and the router (R1 in this case) and is used to authenticate the connection between the router and the server before the user authentication process takes place. Use the secret password of $trongPass that has been configured on the Radius server. Remember that passwords are case-sensitive.

R1(config-radius-server)# key $trongPass
R1(config-radius-server)# end

Note: For the purposes of this lab, an unencrypted password is configured. In the future, IOS will require encrypted passwords.

Part 3: Test the AAA RADIUS Configuration.

Step 1: Start the RADIUS Server and verify operation.

a. At the Security Workstation terminal, start the RADIUS server by entering the sudo systemctl start freeradius.service command. Enter the password net_secPW as necessary.

[[email protected] ~]$ sudo systemctl start freeradius.service

b. Verify that the server is running, enter the command sudo systemctl status freeradius.service at the terminal prompt.

[[email protected] ~]$ sudo systemctl status freeradius.service
? freeradius.service - FreeRADIUS high performance RADIUS server.
     Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/freeradius.service; disabled; vendor
preset: disabled)
     Active: active (running) since Sun 2021-02-14 22:14:07 EST; 18min ago
       Docs: man:radiusd(8)
             man:radiusd.conf(5)
             https://wiki.freeradius.org/Home
             https://networkradius.com/freeradius-documentation/
    Process: 890 ExecStartPre=/usr/bin/radiusd -C (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
    Process: 893 ExecStart=/usr/bin/radiusd -d /etc/raddb (code=exited,
status=0/SUCCESS)
  Main PID: 895 (radiusd)
     Tasks: 6 (limit: 1113)
    Memory: 77.5M
    CGroup: /system.slice/freeradius.service
            mq895 /usr/bin/radiusd -d /etc/raddb

Feb 14 22:14:07 Workstation systemd[1]: Starting FreeRADIUS high performance RADIUS
server....
Feb 14 22:14:07 Workstation systemd[1]: Started FreeRADIUS high performance RADIUS
server..
Step 2: Test your configuration.

You can test and verify your RADIUS server configurations on your router before exiting the router by using the test aaa command. The output message indicates that there is no authoritative response from the RADIUS sever.

R1# test aaa group radius RadUser RadUserpass legacy
Attempting authentication test to server-group radius using radius
No authoritative response from any server

You may also see messages similar to the following may display after the attempted tests indicating that the RADIUS server at 192.168.1.11 is not communicating with the router.

*Feb 15 02:30:26.504: %RADIUS-4-RADIUS_DEAD: RADIUS server 192.168.1.11:1645,1646 is
not responding.
*Feb 15 02:30:26.504: %RADIUS-4-RADIUS_ALIVE: RADIUS server 192.168.1.11:1645,1646 is
being marked alive.
Step 3: Troubleshoot router-to-RADIUS server communication.

The show radius server-group radius command indicates that the router is using UDP ports 1645 and 1646 for communications.

R1# show radius server-group radius
Server group radius
    Sharecount = 1 sg_unconfigured = FALSE
    Type = standard Memlocks = 1
    Server(192.168.1.11:1645,1646) Transactions:
    Authen: 32   Author: 0     Acct: 0
    Server_auto_test_enabled: FALSE
     Keywrap enabled: FALSE

RFC 2865 officially assigned port numbers 1812 and 1813 for RADIUS. This indicates that the router and RADIUS server are not communicating on the same ports.

Step 4: Change the RADIUS port numbers on R1 to match the RADIUS server.

Unless specified otherwise, the Cisco IOS RADIUS configuration defaults to UDP port numbers 1645 and 1646. Either the router Cisco IOS port numbers must be changed to match the port number of the RADIUS server or the RADIUS server port numbers must be changed to match the port numbers of the Cisco IOS router.

a. Re-issue the address sub-mode command again. This time specify port numbers 1812 and 1813, along with the IPv4 address.

R1(config)# radius server NetSec
R1(config-radius-server)# address ipv4 192.168.1.11 auth-port 1812 acct-port 1813

b. Test the router to RADIUS server communications again by using the test aaa command.

R1# test aaa group radius RadUser RadUserpass legacy
Attempting authentication test to server-group radius using radius
User was successfully authenticated.
Step 5: Test your configuration by logging into the console on R1.

a. Exit to the initial router screen that displays: R1 con0 is now available, Press RETURN to get started.

b. Log in again with the username of RadUser and password of RadUserpass.

Were you able to login? Was there any delay this time?
Yes, and there was negligible delay as R1 was able to access the RADIUS server to validate the username and password.

c. Log in again using an invalid username of Userxxx and the password of Userxxxpass.

Were you able to login?
No. R1 accessed the RADIUS server and validation failed.

What message was displayed on the router?
% Authentication failed

d. Log in again using the local user credentials, admin / cisco12345 or user01 / user01pass.

Were you able to log in? Explain.
You will not be able to log in because the user credentials are not configured on the RADIUS server at 192.168.1.11. While the RADIUS server is functioning, you will not be able to authenticate using the credentials from the local user database. To use the local user database when the communication to the RADIUS server fails, change the aaa authentication command to aaa authentication login default group radius local.

Step 6: Create an authentication method list for SSH and test it.

a. Log back into R1 as necessary.

b. Create a unique authentication method list for SSH access to the router. This does not have the fallback of no authentication, so if there is no access to the RADIUS server, SSH access is disabled. Name the authentication method list SSH_LINES.

R1(config)# aaa authentication login SSH_LINES group radius

c. Apply the list to the vty lines on the router using the login authentication command.

R1(config)# line vty 0 4
R1(config-line)# login authentication SSH_LINES

d. Establish an SSH session from PC-C to R1 (10.1.1.1) and log in with the username RadUser and the password of RadUserpass. Were you able to gain access to log in? Explain.
Yes. R1 contacted the RDIUS server for user authentication, and a valid username/password combination was entered on R1.

e. Establish an SSH session from PC-C to R1 again. Log in with the username user01 and the password of user01pass. Were you able to log in? Explain.
No. R1 contacted the RADIUS server for user authentication, and the username/password combination was not defined in the RADIUS database, so access is not granted.

Reflection

1. Why would an organization want to use a centralized authentication server rather than configuring users and passwords on each individual router?
Answers will vary. Updating local databases on network devices is not a scalable solution. A centralized authentication server greatly reduces the administration time required when there are additions or removals to the user list. This is especially true in a large network where the number of updates required might be high enough that a dedicated person could be required.

2. Contrast local authentication and local authentication with AAA.
Answers will vary. With local authentication alone, specific usernames or accounts can be defined in the local router database, with varying privilege levels, that can apply to the router as a whole. When the console, vty, and AUX lines are configured to refer to this local database, the user is prompted for a username and a password when using any of these lines to access the router. Additional control over the login process can be achieved using AAA. For basic authentication, AAA can be configured to access the local database for user logins, and various fallback procedures can be defined.

Router Interface Summary Table

Router Model Ethernet Interface #1 Ethernet Interface #2 Serial Interface #1 Serial Interface #2
1900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0 (G0/0) Gigabit Ethernet 0/1 (G0/1) Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
2900 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0 (G0/0) Gigabit Ethernet 0/1 (G0/1) Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0) Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)
4221 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/0 (G0/0/0) Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/1 (G0/0/1) Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)
4300 Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/0 (G0/0/0) Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/1 (G0/0/1) Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0) Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device. The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

Device Configs

Router R1

R1# show run brief

Building configuration…

Current configuration : 2241 bytes

!

version 16.9

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

platform qfp utilization monitor load 80

platform punt-keepalive disable-kernel-core

!

hostname R1

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

enable secret 8 $8$YjxZMbb1bqes9s$H5HwWzty/6qRiok1NMCKffD1wqUufsyrX6YMC/e2ycg

!

aaa new-model

!

aaa authentication login default group radius none

aaa authentication login SSH_LINES group radius

!

aaa session-id common

!

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name netsec.com

!

login on-success log

!

subscriber templating

!

multilink bundle-name authenticated

!

spanning-tree extend system-id

!

username user01 secret 8 $8$6IcGMKcHe7R12M$Dy9q.GkCzXJg5Cx7yFaI.bR6dwECU.kR6jQNGZ5fVtw

username admin privilege 15 secret 8 $8$MXJNO5Mhyk.6uc$kbAQoC8uW.3NdZODJuFbziYzHQYpaKHE.MtuUCbf..U

!

redundancy

mode none

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0

ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

negotiation auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

negotiation auto

!

router ospf 1

passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0

!

ip forward-protocol nd

no ip http server

ip http secure-server

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.2

!

radius server NetSec

address ipv4 192.168.1.11 auth-port 1812 acct-port 1813

key $trongPass

!

control-plane

!

line con 0

exec-timeout 5 0

logging synchronous

transport input none

stopbits 1

line aux 0

exec-timeout 5 0

stopbits 1

line vty 0 4

exec-timeout 5 0

login authentication SSH_LINES

transport input ssh

!

end

Router R2

R2# show run brief

Building configuration…

Current configuration : 1874 bytes

!

version 16.9

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

platform qfp utilization monitor load 80

platform punt-keepalive disable-kernel-core

!

hostname R2

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

enable secret 8 $8$twAY9IkJHh44iy$shJETWsO3A5fwb5tTae4vQrKh5V..piWxb.GYLu7yH2

!

no aaa new-model

!

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name netsec.com

!

login on-success log

!

subscriber templating

!

multilink bundle-name authenticated

!

spanning-tree extend system-id

!

username user01 secret 8 $8$s2vAYfJfggWj3i$eNP8.OSQaIRuPUPNHvfrzIkxqDU7qi0m5CF6lRqBak.

username admin privilege 15 secret 8 $8$POG3rz58.Xx5wy$fPYI1f0VAw5uqMWivgLbYqHE4LmIaX74d6KF5D7AMe6

!

redundancy

mode none

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0

ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

negotiation auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.252

negotiation auto

!

router ospf 1

passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0

!

ip forward-protocol nd

no ip http server

ip http secure-server

ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.1.1

ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 10.2.2.1

!

control-plane

!

line con 0

exec-timeout 5 0

logging synchronous

login local

transport input none

stopbits 1

line aux 0

exec-timeout 5 0

login local

stopbits 1

line vty 0 4

exec-timeout 5 0

login local

transport input ssh

!

end

Router R3

R3# show run brief

Building configuration…

Current configuration : 1899 bytes

!

version 16.9

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

platform qfp utilization monitor load 80

platform punt-keepalive disable-kernel-core

!

hostname R3

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

enable secret 8 $8$PIewArm.sR1oNi$k7/bCglbIZHJ8u1L.sm1X4KZzncjbRuQHlXJrgD9sm.

!

no aaa new-model

!

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name netsec.com

!

login on-success log

!

subscriber templating

!

multilink bundle-name authenticated

!

spanning-tree extend system-id

!

username user01 secret 8 $8$2bWkNPbnJbwt6y$LGaVjpPs3KO6699Xnk9WidxjT7j3WIflr/y8NYg.fcA

username admin privilege 15 secret 8 $8$ZdEZf7tp2Db1ui$bAaRwFKbp00P1keNmLr9Ub/KuzDfdHGPErXMkItEWBY

!

redundancy

mode none

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0

ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.252

negotiation auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0

negotiation auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0

vrf forwarding Mgmt-intf

no ip address

negotiation auto

!

router ospf 1

passive-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0

!

ip forward-protocol nd

no ip http server

ip http secure-server

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.2.2.2

!

control-plane

!

line con 0

exec-timeout 5 0

logging synchronous

login local

transport input none

stopbits 1

line aux 0

exec-timeout 5 0

login local

stopbits 1

line vty 0 4

exec-timeout 5 0

login local

transport input ssh

!

end

Download 7.4.8 Lab – Configure Server-Based Authentication with RADIUS .PDF files:


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