CCNP TSHOOT Chapter 10 Lab 10-2, Sandbox (Version 7)

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Lab Topology

Overlay Topology

Objectives

  • Load the device configuration files for each trouble ticket.
  • Diagnose and resolve problems related to features, protocols, or technology that could be encountered in a complex, integrated enterprise network.
  • Document the troubleshooting progress, configuration changes, and problem resolution.
  • Practice a representative sample of major technologies in routing and switching to prepare for the final skills assessment.

Background

This lab covers a range of problems and requires that you make use of the troubleshooting skills acquired throughout this course to resolve the routing and switching problems introduced. These trouble tickets may involve technologies from any ROUTE or SWITCH lab. But the focus is on connectivity issues related to RIPng, RIPv2, DHCPv4/6, HSRP, MST, VTPv3, OSPFv3, Named EIGRP, MP-BGP, VRF, prefix lists, distribute lists, offset lists, route maps, the distance command, redistribution, EEM applets, tracking with ICMPv4 echo SLAs, tracking with IPv6 TCP SLAs, and tracking lists of objects with Boolean expressions.

For each task or trouble ticket, the trouble scenario and problem symptom are described. While troubleshooting, you will discover the cause of the problem, correct it, and then document the process and results.

Trouble Tickets and Troubleshooting Logs

This lab includes three tasks. Each task is associated with a trouble ticket (TT) and introduces one or more errors on one or more devices. If time is a consideration, each task or trouble ticket can be performed independently.

Note: This lab uses Cisco ISR G2 routers running Cisco IOS 15.4(3) images with IP Base and Security packages enabled, and Cisco Catalyst 3560 and 2960 switches running Cisco IOS 15.0(2) IP Services and LAN Base images, respectively. The 3560 and 2960 switches are configured with the SDM templates dual-ipv4-and-ipv6 routing and lanbase-routing, respectively. Depending on the router or switch model and Cisco IOS Software version, the commands available and output produced might vary from what is shown in this lab. Any changes made to the baseline configurations or topology (other than errors introduced) are noted in the trouble ticket so that you are aware of them prior to beginning the troubleshooting process.

Required Resources

  • 3 routers (Cisco IOS Release 15.4 or comparable)
  • 2 multilayer switches and 1 access layer switch (Cisco IOS Release 15.0(2) or comparable with Fast Ethernet interfaces)
  • SRV1 (PC with static IP address): Windows 7 with RADIUS, TFTP, and syslog servers, plus an SSH client, SNMP monitor, and WireShark software
  • PC-B (DHCP client): Windows 7 with SSH client and WireShark software
  • PC-C (DHCP client): Windows 7 with SSH client and WireShark software
  • Serial and Ethernet cables, as shown in the topology

Task 1: Verify Routing Tables for Lab 10-2 TT-A

Step 1: Review trouble ticket Lab 10-2 TT-A.

The Sandbox company is a franchisee of Sand Beach corporation. The Sandbox company never got off the ground due to an unexpected failure in the owner’s creative financing arrangement. The Sand Beach franchisor initiated a corporate downsizing, which forced two other franchisees in the region to close their Sand Beach locations. The two owners of these identically constructed Sand Beach locations exercised a concession offered by the franchisor to consolidate and acquire the Sandbox franchisee.

The owners of the consolidated Sandbox company quickly drafted a transition agreement. The two CIOs were convinced that the consolidation would result in one of them being let go, so they decided to work together to ensure that both were integral to the success of the company. They managed to convince the owners to include language in the agreement which specifies that Sandbox will initially replicate the familiar network environments associated with the franchisees’ original locations. The owners signed off on the transition agreement.

The CIOs drew up the network design for Sandbox, which ensured their job security for the foreseeable future. The CIOs put their network engineers to work implementing the network design. The outcome is a complex network, including an overlay of a RIPv2/RIPng implementation with a GRE tunnel on top of an underlying topology based on OSPF, EIGRP, and multihomed MP-BGP.

The “Lab Topology” is the fully functional topology of one franchisee, involving a multihomed MP-BGP implementation. The “Overlay Topology” is the fully functional topology of the other franchisee, involving an integrated, relatively simple, in-house implementation of RIPv2 and RIPng in a singular routing domain. The two CIOs integrated their respective topologies in a lengthy process, working together to provide a robust, resilient network for Sandbox. The resulting implementation is designed so that removing the RIPv2, RIPng, GRE tunnel, EEM applets, and the secondary serial subinterface configurations reduces the network to the Lab Topology. The franchisee owners and CIOs have invested enough time and effort with the network consolidation, and need to focus on business operations.

Lab Note: VRF_A and VRF_B are two VRFs configured on R2. This enables R2 to represent two independent ISPs, AS65502 and AS65503. These ISPs also connect to the Internet, which is represented by the global routing table of R2. To reiterate, R2 has a VRF_A routing table, a VRF_B routing table, and a global routing table, which represent independent networks. It is common with VRF implementations to have overlapping IP address spaces, where each VRF is associated with a different company. The VRF_A routing table is displayed by entering entering show ip route vrf VPN_A and show ipv6 route vrf VPN_A on R2. The VRF_B routing table is displayed by entering entering show ip route vrf VPN_B and show ipv6 route vrf VPN_B on R2. The global routing table represents a globally unique address space associated with the Internet. Technically, the global routing table in this lab is the one displayed by entering show ip route and show ipv6 route on R2 while the G0/0 interface is shut down; but much of the lab is performed with the G0/0 interface up, allowing for the injection of other non-VRF routes from the topology into the global routing table of R2 via RIPv2, RIPng, and EIGRP.

The network documentation and testing are incomplete and the Sandbox launch is imminent. To help Sandbox launch on schedule, you have been contracted. Your job is to ensure the consolidated network is fully functional under any scenario involving two or less failed service provider links. The service provider gigabit link on R2 connecting to the Sandbox access layer switch is only available on an interim basis, as a favor from the previous owner – why it links into Sandbox at the access layer and why your company provides dynamic addressing for the associated R2 interface is a story for another day. In any case, your first task is to verify full IPv4 and IPv6 network functionality for Scenario 1 of Table 1 (all interfaces are up), and then document the IPv4 and IPv6 network functionality for Scenarios 2 through 7.

Table 1: R2 Line Protocol States

Scenario 1 S0/0/0 up S0/0/1 up G0/0 up
Scenario 2 S0/0/0 down S0/0/1 up G0/0 up
Scenario 3 S0/0/0 up S0/0/1 down G0/0 up
Scenario 4 S0/0/0 down S0/0/1 down G0/0 up
Scenario 5 S0/0/0 up S0/0/1 up G0/0 down
Scenario 6 S0/0/0 down S0/0/1 up G0/0 down
Scenario 7 S0/0/0 up S0/0/1 down G0/0 down

The CIOs have provided you with a list of routing table outputs for you to validate against as you familiarize yourself with the Sandbox topology and document your findings. Any errors introduced in the network implementation are inadvertent. The CIOs give you explicit instructions that you are not to make changes to the device configurations during this phase of preparing the Sandbox network for the grand opening.

Lab Notes:

• Back-to-back Frame Relay configurations are used on the serial links in order to provide two parallel point-to-point connections for each of the R2-R1 and R2-R3 serial links. No configuration or troubleshooting of Frame Relay is required.
• The VRF configuration on R2 is designed to simulate a multi-homed BGP environment. No configuration or troubleshooting of VRF is required. However, to verify the routing tables of the simulated service providers, the VRF versions of the associated traditional IOS commands are used.
• There is no inter-VRF routing (route leaking) configured on R2, so the VRF_A, VRF_B, and global routing tables on R2 are actually independent.
• IPv4 is the BGP transport for both IPv4 and IPv6 routes.
• VLANs 99, 100, 110, 120, 200, 300 are allowed on all port channel interfaces on all switches.
• VLAN 300 is the only VLAN used for OSPF peering between DLS1 and DLS2.
• Subsequent references in this lab to “Scenario 1” should be understood to mean Scenario 1 of Table 1. Similarly for Scenarios 2-7.
• Interfaces G0/1 on R1, G0/1 on R3, F0/5 on DLS1, Po1 on DLS1, Po10 on DLS1, F0/5 on DLS2, Po2 on DLS2, and Po10 on DLS2 should always be “up/up” during any testing and validation in Task 1.
• For the purposes of this lab, R1 is assumed to not support RIPng throughout the entire lab.

Step 2: Load the device trouble ticket configuration files for TT-A.

Using the procedure described in the BASE Lab, verify that the lab configuration files are present in flash. Load the proper configuration files as indicated in the Device Configuration File table.

Device Configuration File Table

Device Name File to Load Notes
ALS1 Lab102-ALS1-TT-A-Cfg.txt
DLS1 Lab102-DLS1-TT-A-Cfg.txt
DLS2 Lab102-DLS2-TT-A-Cfg.txt
R1 Lab102-R1-TT-A-Cfg.txt
R2 Lab102-R2-TT-A-Cfg.txt
R3 Lab102-R3-TT-A-Cfg.txt
SRV1 N/A Static IP: 10.1.100.1/24 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:100::1/64
Default gateway: 10.1.100.254 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:100::D1
PC-B N/A DHCPv4 and DHCPv6
PC-C N/A DHCPv4 and DHCPv6

Step 3: Ensure proper MST and VTPv3 operation.

Sometimes MST and VTPv3 do not operate as expected. Check all the items listed below, and make changes as necessary to validate each item.

a. Check that each switch has VLANs 99, 100, 120, 200, 300, 666, and 999!
b. Check that the MST region name is TSHOOT.
c. Check that the MST configuration revision number is 25.
d. Check that VLANs 99, 110, and 120 are mapped to MST instance 1.
e. Check that VLANs 100, 200, and 300 are mapped to MST instance 2.
f. Check that DLS1 is the root for instance 1 and DLS2 is the root for instance 2.
g. Check that exactly one port channel interface on ALS1 is blocking for each MST instance. Note: If you see error messages on ALS1, such as

Oct 29 16:36:02.640: %SW_MATM-4-MACFLAP_NOTIF: Host 001e.14cf.1b46 in vlan 200 is flapping between port Po2 and port Po1

or if MST is not converging properly, try shutting down Po1 and Po2 on ALS1, allowing MST to converge between DLS1 and DLS2, and then bringing up Po1 and Po2 on ALS1.

Step 4: Configure SRV1 and start the syslog and TFTP servers.

a. Configure SRV1 with the static IPv4/6 static addressing from the Device Configuration File Table.
b. Start the syslog server on SRV1 to monitor console messages from multiple devices.
c. Start the TFTP server on SRV1 to record device configuration changes.
d. Start the SNMP monitor on SRV1 to record SNMPv2c trap reports.

Step 5: Release and renew the DHCP leases.

a. Ensure that PC-B are PC-C are configured as DHCPv4/6 clients.
b. After loading all TT-A device configuration files, issue the ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew commands on PC-B and PC-C.
c. Verify that PC-B has DHCPv4/6 data for OFFICE VLAN 120.
d. Verify that PC-C has DHCP4/6 addressing on subnets 10.1.80.0/25 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:800:ABCD::/80 and is allocated the tshoot.net DNS suffix.
e. Verify that the LAN interface of R2 has DHCP4/6 addressing on subnets 10.1.120.0/24 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64.

Step 6: Outline the troubleshooting approach and validation steps.

The following commands are useful for troubleshooting why a particular route is missing, keeping in mind that there are no intentional errors introduced in this ticket:

show ip route
show ipv6 route
show ip route vrf VPN_A (on R2)
show ip route vrf VPN_B (on R2)
show ipv6 route vrf VPN_A (on R2)
show ipv6 route vrf VPN_B (on R2)
show ip protocol
show ipv6 protocol
show bgp summary
show bgp all
show bgp ipv4 unicast
show bgp ipv4 unicast summary
show bgp ipv6 unicast
show bgp ipv6 unicast summary
show bgp vpnv4 unicast vrf VPN_A (on R2)
show bgp vpnv4 unicast vrf VPN_B (on R2)
show bgp vpnv4 unicast vrf VPN_A summary (on R2)
show bgp vpnv4 unicast vrf VPN_B summary (on R2)
show bgp vpnv6 unicast vrf VPN_A (on R2)
show bgp vpnv6 unicast vrf VPN_B (on R2)
show bgp vpnv6 unicast vrf VPN_A summary (on R2)
show bgp vpnv6 unicast vrf VPN_B summary (on R2)
show ip interface brief
show ipv6 interface brief
show interfaces description
show track
show track brief
show ip sla statistics
show ip sla configuration

There are several alias exec commands included in the configuration files as shortcuts, such as alias exec sre show run | begin router eigrp., which allows you to enter sre in place of show run | begin router eigrp. You can create your own aliases, use the ones provided, or ignore these shortcuts.

Use this space to identify your troubleshooting approach and the key steps to verify that the problem is resolved. Troubleshooting approaches to select from include the follow-the-path, perform-comparison, bottom-up, top-down, divide-and-conquer, shoot-from-the-hip, and swap-components (move-the-problem) methods.

Note: In addition to a specific approach, you can use the generic troubleshooting process: defining a problem, gathering information, analyzing the information, eliminating possible problem causes, formulating a hypothesis about the likely cause of the problem, testing that hypothesis, and solving the problem.
__________________________________________________________________

Step 7: Record the troubleshooting process and configuration changes.

Validate each IPv4 and IPv6 route on each device according to the routing table outputs provided by the CIOs. Use the commands in Step 6 to troubleshoot any inadvertent omissions or additions. For validation and later reference, here are the IPv4 and IPv6 routing tables provided by the CIOs (Scenario 1):

R1# show ip route | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 209.165.200.226 to network 0.0.0.0

B*    0.0.0.0/0 [20/0] via 209.165.200.226, 07:37:47
      2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        2.2.2.2 [20/0] via 209.165.200.226, 14:26:21
      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 15 subnets, 6 masks
S        10.1.0.0/16 is directly connected, Null0
C        10.1.2.0/30 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
L        10.1.2.2/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
O        10.1.2.12/30 [110/3] via 10.1.2.1, 00:56:11, GigabitEthernet0/1
R        10.1.30.0/24 [109/1] via 10.1.2.1, 00:00:15, GigabitEthernet0/1
O E1     10.1.80.0/25 [110/103] via 10.1.2.1, 00:56:01, GigabitEthernet0/1
O E1     10.1.80.128/25 [110/103] via 10.1.2.1, 00:56:01, GigabitEthernet0/1
O E1     10.1.90.2/31 [110/103] via 10.1.2.1, 00:56:01, GigabitEthernet0/1
R        10.1.99.0/24 [109/1] via 10.1.2.1, 00:00:15, GigabitEthernet0/1
R        10.1.100.0/24 [109/1] via 10.1.2.1, 00:00:15, GigabitEthernet0/1
R        10.1.110.0/24 [109/1] via 10.1.2.1, 00:00:15, GigabitEthernet0/1
O IA     10.1.120.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.1, 13:57:28, GigabitEthernet0/1
R        10.1.200.0/24 [109/1] via 10.1.2.1, 00:00:15, GigabitEthernet0/1
O        10.1.211.1/32 [110/2] via 10.1.2.1, 13:57:28, GigabitEthernet0/1
O        10.1.212.1/32 [110/3] via 10.1.2.1, 13:57:28, GigabitEthernet0/1
      20.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R        20.20.20.20 [109/1] via 209.165.200.230, 00:00:08, Serial0/0/0.2
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C        192.168.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O        192.168.3.1 [110/4] via 10.1.2.1, 00:56:01, GigabitEthernet0/1
      209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks
O E1     209.165.200.220/30 [110/103] via 10.1.2.1, 00:56:01, GigabitEthernet0/1
C        209.165.200.224/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.1
L        209.165.200.225/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.1
C        209.165.200.228/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.2
L        209.165.200.229/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.2

R1# show ipv6 route | begin 20/0
B   ::/0 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:10::2
S   2001:DB8:CAFE::/48 [1/0]
     via Null0, directly connected
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:6::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.2, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:6::1/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.2, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:20::/64 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:20::1/128 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/1, receive
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:90::/126 [110/103]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:99::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:100::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:110::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:200::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
LC  2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback0, receive
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [110/3]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::/64 [110/3]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:800::/64 [110/103]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:801::/64 [110/103]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:2020::2/128 [110/103]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:2110::D1/128 [110/1]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:2120::D2/128 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
C   2001:DB8:FEED:10::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:FEED:10::1/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.1, receive
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [110/103]
     via FE80::D1, GigabitEthernet0/1
B   2001:DB8:FEED:222::2/128 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:10::2
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

R2# show ip route | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 10.1.120.254 to network 0.0.0.0

S*    0.0.0.0/0 [254/0] via 10.1.120.254
      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 13 subnets, 5 masks
R        10.1.2.0/30 [120/1] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
R        10.1.2.12/30 [120/1] via 10.1.90.3, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/1.2
R        10.1.30.0/24 [120/2] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
D        10.1.80.0/25 [90/13607262] via 10.1.90.3, 15:23:20, Serial0/0/1.2
D        10.1.80.128/25 [90/13556702] via 10.1.90.3, 15:23:20, Serial0/0/1.2
C        10.1.90.2/31 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.2
L        10.1.90.2/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.2
R        10.1.99.0/24 [120/2] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
R        10.1.100.0/24 [120/2] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
R        10.1.110.0/24 [120/2] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
C        10.1.120.0/24 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
L        10.1.120.8/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
R        10.1.200.0/24 [120/2] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
      20.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C        20.20.20.20 is directly connected, Loopback2
      22.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        22.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Loopback3
L        22.22.22.22/32 is directly connected, Loopback3
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R        192.168.1.1 [120/1] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R        192.168.3.1 [120/1] via 10.1.90.3, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/1.2
      209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 4 subnets, 2 masks
R        209.165.200.220/30 [120/1] via 10.1.90.3, 00:00:14, Serial0/0/1.2
R        209.165.200.224/30 [120/1] via 209.165.200.229, 00:00:25, Serial0/0/0.2
C        209.165.200.228/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.2
L        209.165.200.230/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.2

R2# show ipv6 route | begin ::/0
ND  ::/0 [2/0]
     via FE80::A1, GigabitEthernet0/0
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:6::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.2, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:6::2/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.2, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:90::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.2, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:90::2/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.2, receive
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::/64 [120/2]
     via FE80::D1, Tunnel0
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::/64 [120/2]
     via FE80::D1, Tunnel0
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::/64 [120/2]
     via FE80::D1, Tunnel0
NDp 2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64 [2/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/0, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::2/128 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/0, receive
S   2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [1/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.2, directly connected
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [120/6]
     via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1.2
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::/64 [120/6]
     via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1.2
D   2001:DB8:CAFE:800::/64 [90/13607262]
     via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1.2
D   2001:DB8:CAFE:801::/64 [90/13556702]
     via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1.2
LC  2001:DB8:CAFE:2020::2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback2, receive
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:2110::D1/128 [120/2]
     via FE80::D1, Tunnel0
C   2001:DB8:EFAC::/48 [0/0]
     via Loopback3, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:EFAC::2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback3, receive
D   2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [90/23796062]
     via FE80::3, Serial0/0/1.2
C   FC00::/7 [0/0]
     via Tunnel0, directly connected
L   FC00::2/128 [0/0]
     via Tunnel0, receive
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

R2# show ip route vrf VPN_A | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0

S*    0.0.0.0/0 is directly connected, Null0
      2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C        2.2.2.2 is directly connected, Loopback0
      10.0.0.0/16 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        10.1.0.0 [20/0] via 209.165.200.225, 14:36:47
      22.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        22.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Loopback4
L        22.22.22.22/32 is directly connected, Loopback4
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        192.168.1.1 [20/0] via 209.165.200.225, 00:22:13
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        192.168.3.1 [20/0] via 209.165.200.225, 00:18:41
      209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks
B        209.165.200.220/30 [20/0] via 209.165.200.225, 04:31:59
C        209.165.200.224/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.1
L        209.165.200.226/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0.1

R2# show ipv6 route vrf VPN_A | begin ::/0
S   ::/0 [1/0]
     via Null0, directly connected
B   2001:DB8:CAFE::/48 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:10::1
B   2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:10::1
B   2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:10::1
C   2001:DB8:EFAC::/48 [0/0]
     via Loopback4, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:EFAC::2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback4, receive
C   2001:DB8:FEED:10::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:FEED:10::2/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/0.1, receive
B   2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:10::1
LC  2001:DB8:FEED:222::2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback0, receive
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

R2# show ip route vrf VPN_B | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 0.0.0.0 to network 0.0.0.0

S*    0.0.0.0/0 is directly connected, Null0
      2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C        2.2.2.2 is directly connected, Loopback1
      10.0.0.0/16 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        10.1.0.0 [20/0] via 209.165.200.221, 14:20:14
      22.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        22.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Loopback5
L        22.22.22.22/32 is directly connected, Loopback5
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        192.168.1.1 [20/0] via 209.165.200.221, 00:23:17
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        192.168.3.1 [20/0] via 209.165.200.221, 00:19:45
      209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks
C        209.165.200.220/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.1
L        209.165.200.222/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.1
B        209.165.200.224/30 [20/0] via 209.165.200.221, 04:33:00

R2# show ipv6 route vrf VPN_B | begin ::/0 
S   ::/0 [1/0]
     via Null0, directly connected
B   2001:DB8:CAFE::/48 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:14::3
B   2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:14::3
B   2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:14::3
C   2001:DB8:EFAC::/48 [0/0]
     via Loopback5, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:EFAC::2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback5, receive
B   2001:DB8:FEED:10::/126 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:14::3
C   2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:FEED:14::2/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.1, receive
LC  2001:DB8:FEED:222::2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback1, receive
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

R3# show ip route | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 209.165.200.222 to network 0.0.0.0

B*    0.0.0.0/0 [20/0] via 209.165.200.222, 14:27:07
      2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B        2.2.2.2 [20/0] via 209.165.200.222, 14:27:07
      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 18 subnets, 6 masks
S        10.1.0.0/16 is directly connected, Null0
O        10.1.2.0/30 [110/3] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
C        10.1.2.12/30 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
L        10.1.2.14/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/1
O        10.1.30.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
C        10.1.80.0/25 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
L        10.1.80.1/32 is directly connected, GigabitEthernet0/0
C        10.1.80.128/25 is directly connected, Loopback1
L        10.1.80.129/32 is directly connected, Loopback1
C        10.1.90.2/31 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.2
L        10.1.90.3/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.2
O IA     10.1.99.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
O IA     10.1.100.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
O IA     10.1.110.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
O IA     10.1.120.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
O IA     10.1.200.0/24 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
O        10.1.211.1/32 [110/3] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
O        10.1.212.1/32 [110/2] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
      20.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
D        20.20.20.20 [90/13556702] via 10.1.90.2, 14:27:09, Serial0/0/1.2
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O        192.168.1.1 [110/4] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C        192.168.3.1 is directly connected, Loopback0
      209.165.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 4 subnets, 2 masks
C        209.165.200.220/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.1
L        209.165.200.221/32 is directly connected, Serial0/0/1.1
O E1     209.165.200.224/30 
           [110/103] via 10.1.2.13, 01:14:34, GigabitEthernet0/1
R        209.165.200.228/30 [120/1] via 10.1.90.2, 00:00:21, Serial0/0/1.2

R3# show ipv6 route | begin 20/0
B   ::/0 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:14::2
S   2001:DB8:CAFE::/48 [1/0]
     via Null0, directly connected
D   2001:DB8:CAFE:6::/126 [90/23796062]
     via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1.2
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:20::/64 [110/3]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:90::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.2, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:90::3/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.2, receive
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:99::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:100::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:110::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
OI  2001:DB8:CAFE:200::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [110/3]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
LC  2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback0, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::/64 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::3/128 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/1, receive
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:800::/64 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/0, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:800::1/128 [0/0]
     via GigabitEthernet0/0, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:801::/64 [0/0]
     via Loopback1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:801::1/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback1, receive
D   2001:DB8:CAFE:2020::2/128 [90/13556702]
     via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1.2
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:2110::D1/128 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:2120::D2/128 [110/1]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:10::/126 [110/103]
     via FE80::D2, GigabitEthernet0/1
C   2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.1, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:FEED:14::3/128 [0/0]
     via Serial0/0/1.1, receive
B   2001:DB8:FEED:222::2/128 [20/0]
     via 2001:DB8:FEED:14::2
R   FC00::/7 [120/2]
     via FE80::2, Serial0/0/1.2
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

DLS1# show ip route | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 10.1.2.2 to network 0.0.0.0

O*E1  0.0.0.0/0 [110/101] via 10.1.2.2, 00:33:34, FastEthernet0/5
      2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E1     2.2.2.2 [110/101] via 10.1.2.2, 00:33:34, FastEthernet0/5
      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 21 subnets, 6 masks
O E1     10.1.0.0/16 [110/101] via 10.1.2.2, 00:33:34, FastEthernet0/5
C        10.1.2.0/30 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/5
L        10.1.2.1/32 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/5
O        10.1.2.12/30 [110/2] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
C        10.1.30.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan300
L        10.1.30.252/32 is directly connected, Vlan300
O E1     10.1.80.0/25 [110/102] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
O E1     10.1.80.128/25 [110/102] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
O E1     10.1.90.2/31 [110/102] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
C        10.1.99.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan99
L        10.1.99.252/32 is directly connected, Vlan99
C        10.1.100.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan100
L        10.1.100.252/32 is directly connected, Vlan100
C        10.1.110.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan110
L        10.1.110.252/32 is directly connected, Vlan110
C        10.1.120.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan120
L        10.1.120.252/32 is directly connected, Vlan120
C        10.1.200.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan200
L        10.1.200.252/32 is directly connected, Vlan200
C        10.1.211.1/32 is directly connected, Loopback0
O        10.1.212.1/32 [110/2] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
      20.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E1     20.20.20.20 [110/102] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O        192.168.1.1 [110/2] via 10.1.2.2, 00:33:34, FastEthernet0/5
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O        192.168.3.1 [110/3] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
      209.165.200.0/30 is subnetted, 3 subnets
O E1     209.165.200.220 [110/102] via 10.1.30.253, 00:33:34, Vlan300
O E1     209.165.200.224 [110/101] via 10.1.2.2, 00:33:34, FastEthernet0/5
R        209.165.200.228 [120/1] via 10.1.120.8, 00:00:21, Vlan120
                         [120/1] via 10.1.2.2, 00:00:01, FastEthernet0/5

DLS1# show ipv6 route | begin ::/0
OE1 ::/0 [110/101], tag 2
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:6::/126 [110/102]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:20::/64 [0/0]
     via FastEthernet0/5, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:20::D1/128 [0/0]
     via FastEthernet0/5, receive
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:90::/126 [110/102]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan99, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan99, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan100, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan100, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan110, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan110, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan120, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan120, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:200::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan200, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:200::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan200, receive
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [110/1]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan300, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan300, receive
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:800::/64 [110/102]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:801::/64 [110/102]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:2020::2/128 [110/102]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
LC  2001:DB8:CAFE:2110::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback0, receive
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:2120::D2/128 [110/1]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:10::/126 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [110/102]
     via FE80::D2, Vlan300
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:222::2/128 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
C   FC00::/7 [0/0]
     via Tunnel0, directly connected
L   FC00::D1/128 [0/0]
     via Tunnel0, receive
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

ALS1# show ip route | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 10.1.99.254 to network 0.0.0.0

S*    0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 10.1.99.254
      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 12 subnets, 2 masks
C        10.1.30.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan300
L        10.1.30.251/32 is directly connected, Vlan300
C        10.1.99.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan99
L        10.1.99.251/32 is directly connected, Vlan99
C        10.1.100.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan100
L        10.1.100.251/32 is directly connected, Vlan100
C        10.1.110.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan110
L        10.1.110.251/32 is directly connected, Vlan110
C        10.1.120.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan120
L        10.1.120.251/32 is directly connected, Vlan120
C        10.1.200.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan200
L        10.1.200.251/32 is directly connected, Vlan200

ALS1# show ipv6 route | begin ::/0
S   ::/0 [1/0]
     via 2001:DB8:CAFE:99::D1
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan99, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::A1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan99, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan100, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::A1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan100, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan110, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::A1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan110, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan120, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::A1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan120, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:200::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan200, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:200::A1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan200, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan300, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::A1/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan300, receive
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

DLS2# show ip route | begin Gateway
Gateway of last resort is 10.1.2.14 to network 0.0.0.0

O*E1  0.0.0.0/0 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
      2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E1     2.2.2.2 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 21 subnets, 6 masks
O E1     10.1.0.0/16 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
O        10.1.2.0/30 [110/2] via 10.1.30.252, 14:27:06, Vlan300
C        10.1.2.12/30 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/5
L        10.1.2.13/32 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/5
C        10.1.30.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan300
L        10.1.30.253/32 is directly connected, Vlan300
O E1     10.1.80.0/25 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
O E1     10.1.80.128/25 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
O E1     10.1.90.2/31 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
C        10.1.99.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan99
L        10.1.99.253/32 is directly connected, Vlan99
C        10.1.100.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan100
L        10.1.100.253/32 is directly connected, Vlan100
C        10.1.110.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan110
L        10.1.110.253/32 is directly connected, Vlan110
C        10.1.120.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan120
L        10.1.120.253/32 is directly connected, Vlan120
C        10.1.200.0/24 is directly connected, Vlan200
L        10.1.200.253/32 is directly connected, Vlan200
O        10.1.211.1/32 [110/2] via 10.1.30.252, 16:53:36, Vlan300
C        10.1.212.1/32 is directly connected, Loopback0
      20.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E1     20.20.20.20 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
      192.168.1.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O        192.168.1.1 [110/3] via 10.1.30.252, 14:26:11, Vlan300
      192.168.3.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O        192.168.3.1 [110/2] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
      209.165.200.0/30 is subnetted, 3 subnets
O E1     209.165.200.220 [110/101] via 10.1.2.14, 01:25:05, FastEthernet0/5
O E1     209.165.200.224 [110/102] via 10.1.30.252, 14:26:11, Vlan300
R        209.165.200.228 [120/1] via 10.1.120.8, 00:00:03, Vlan120

DLS2# show ipv6 route | begin ::/0
OE1 ::/0 [110/101], tag 2
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:6::/126 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:20::/64 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, Vlan300
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:90::/126 [109/2]
     via FE80::2, Vlan120
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan99, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:99::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan99, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan100, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:100::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan100, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan110, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:110::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan110, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan120, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:120::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan120, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:200::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan200, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:200::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan200, receive
O   2001:DB8:CAFE:201::1/128 [110/2]
     via FE80::D1, Vlan300
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:203::1/128 [109/2]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::/64 [0/0]
     via FastEthernet0/5, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:212::D2/128 [0/0]
     via FastEthernet0/5, receive
C   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::/64 [0/0]
     via Vlan300, directly connected
L   2001:DB8:CAFE:300::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Vlan300, receive
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:800::/64 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
OE1 2001:DB8:CAFE:801::/64 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:2020::2/128 [109/2]
     via FE80::2, Vlan120
R   2001:DB8:CAFE:2110::D1/128 [109/2]
     via FE80::D1, Vlan110
     via FE80::D1, Vlan99
     via FE80::D1, Vlan100
     via FE80::D1, Vlan120
LC  2001:DB8:CAFE:2120::D2/128 [0/0]
     via Loopback0, receive
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:10::/126 [110/102]
     via FE80::D1, Vlan300
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:14::/126 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
OE1 2001:DB8:FEED:222::2/128 [110/101]
     via FE80::1, FastEthernet0/5
R   FC00::/7 [109/2]
     via FE80::2, Vlan120
     via FE80::D1, Vlan120
     via FE80::D1, Vlan110
     via FE80::D1, Vlan100
     via FE80::D1, Vlan99
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive

Use this log to document your actions and results during the troubleshooting process. List the commands you used to gather information. As you progress, record your thoughts as to what you think the problem might be and which actions you take to correct the problem.

Device Actions and Results

Step 8: Document trouble ticket debrief notes.

Use this space to make notes of the key learning points that you picked up during the discussion of this trouble ticket with your instructor. The notes can include problems encountered, solutions applied, useful commands employed, alternate solutions, methods, and processes, and procedure and communication improvements.
____________________________________________________________________

Task 2: Trouble Ticket Lab 10-2 TT-B

Step 1: Review trouble ticket Lab 10-2 TT-B.

Your contract work paid off. The CIOs are happy with your documentation, which verifies connectivity under all service provider failover scenarios. They asked you to give a presentation tomorrow to demonstrate the network resiliency. In preparation for the presentation, you discover that some LAN failover scenarios are not working properly. There are a lot of missing routes as well. It appears that someone made some undocumented changes after your network testing. The pressure is on for you to fix the issue(s) today!

Step 2: Load the device trouble ticket configuration files for TT-B.

Using the procedure described in the BASE Lab, verify that the lab configuration files are present in flash. Load the proper configuration files as indicated in the Device Configuration File table. Watch the configuration sequences load to ensure that no commands are failing upon being entered. Remember to check that the appropriate SDM templates are loading on the switches.

Device Configuration File Table

Device Name File to Load Notes
ALS1 Lab102-ALS1-TT-B-Cfg.txt
DLS1 Lab102-DLS1-TT-B-Cfg.txt
DLS2 Lab102-DLS2-TT-B-Cfg.txt
R1 Lab102-R1-TT-B-Cfg.txt
R2 Lab102-R2-TT-B-Cfg.txt
R3 Lab102-R3-TT-B-Cfg.txt
SRV1 N/A Static IP: 10.1.100.1/24 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:100::1/64
Default gateway: 10.1.100.254 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:100::D1
PC-B N/A DHCPv4 and DHCPv6
PC-C N/A DHCPv4 and DHCPv6

Step 3: Ensure proper MST and VTPv3 operation.

Sometimes MST and VTPv3 do not operate as expect. Check all the items listed below, and make changes as necessary to validate each item.

a. Check that each switch has VLANs 99, 100, 120, 200, 300, 666, and 999.
b. Check that the MST region name is TSHOOT.
c. Check that the MST configuration revision number is 25.
d. Check that VLANs 99, 110, and 120 are mapped to MST instance 1.
e. Check that VLANs 100, 200, and 300 are mapped to MST instance 2.
f. Check that DLS1 is the root for instance 1 and DLS2 is the root for instance 2.
g. Check that exactly one port channel interface on ALS1 is blocking for each MST instance.

Step 4: Configure SRV1 and start the syslog and TFTP servers.

a. Configure SRV1 with the static IP address 10.1.100.1/24 and default gateway 10.1.100.254.
b. Start the syslog server on SRV1 to monitor console messages from multiple devices.
c. Start the TFTP server on SRV1 to record device configuration changes.

Step 5: Release and renew the DHCP lease on PC-B and PC-C.

a. Ensure that PC-B is configured as a DHCP client in the OFFICE VLAN.
b. Ensure that PC-C is configured as a DHCP client in the R3 branch office LAN.
c. After loading all TT-B device configuration files, issue the ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew commands on PC-B and PC-C.

Step 6: Outline the troubleshooting approach and validation steps.

Use this space to identify your troubleshooting approach and the key steps to verify that the problem is resolved. Troubleshooting approaches to select from include the follow-the-path, perform-comparison, bottom-up, top-down, divide-and-conquer, shoot-from-the-hip, and swap-components (move-the-problem) methods.

Note: In addition to a specific approach, you can use the generic troubleshooting process: defining a problem, gathering information, analyzing the information, eliminating possible problem causes, formulating a hypothesis about the likely cause of the problem, testing that hypothesis, and solving the problem.
_________________________________________________________________

Step 7: Record the troubleshooting process and configuration changes.

Use this log to document your actions and results during the troubleshooting process. List the commands you used to gather information. As you progress, record your thoughts as to what you think the problem might be and which actions you take to correct the problem.

Device Actions and Results

Step 8: Document trouble ticket debrief notes.

Use this space to make notes of the key learning points that you picked up during the discussion of this trouble ticket with the instructor. The notes can include problems encountered, solutions applied, useful commands employed, alternate solutions, methods, and processes, and procedure and communication improvements.
_______________________________________________________________

Task 3: Trouble Ticket Lab 10-2 TT-C

Step 1: Review trouble ticket Lab 10-2 TT-C.

You resolved the issues in time to finish your presentation to the CIOs and it went smoothly. You have some down time and decide to try implementing the EIGRP Stub Routing feature to simplify the EIGRP configuration for the collocated office. The complexity of the network is making it difficult for you to get it working. Your window of opportunity is closing today, but you want to show the CIOs that you have a proof-of-concept for an EIGRP stub solution. It makes sense to include some selective route summarization in the network, but now you need to troubleshoot your own work. Ensure that network connectivity is at least at the same level as you validated for TT-A (Task 1) Scenario 1.

Step 2: Load the device trouble ticket configuration files for TT-C.

Using the procedure described in the BASE Lab, verify that the lab configuration files are present in flash. Load the proper configuration files as indicated in the Device Configuration File table. Watch the configuration sequences load to ensure that no commands are failing upon being entered. Remember to check that the appropriate SDM templates are loading on the switches.

Device Configuration File Table

Device Name File to Load Notes
ALS1 Lab102-ALS1-TT-C-Cfg.txt
DLS1 Lab102-DLS1-TT-C-Cfg.txt
DLS2 Lab102-DLS2-TT-C-Cfg.txt
R1 Lab102-R1-TT-C-Cfg.txt
R2 Lab102-R2-TT-C-Cfg.txt
R3 Lab102-R3-TT-C-Cfg.txt
SRV1 N/A Static IP: 10.1.100.1/24 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:100::1/64
Default gateway: 10.1.100.254 and 2001:DB8:CAFE:100::D1
PC-B N/A DHCPv4 and DHCPv6
PC-C N/A DHCPv4 and DHCPv6

Step 3: Ensure proper MST and VTPv3 operation.

Sometimes MST and VTPv3 do not operate as expect. Check all the items listed below, and make changes as necessary to validate each item.

a. Check that each switch has VLANs 99, 100, 120, 200, 300, 666, and 999.
b. Check that the MST region name is TSHOOT.
c. Check that the MST configuration revision number is 25.
d. Check that VLANs 99, 110, and 120 are mapped to MST instance 1.
e. Check that VLANs 100, 200, and 300 are mapped to MST instance 2.
f. Check that DLS1 is the root for instance 1 and DLS2 is the root for instance 2.
g. Check that exactly one port channel interface on ALS1 is blocking for each MST instance.

Step 4: Configure SRV1 and start the syslog and TFTP servers.

a. Configure SRV1 with the static IP address 10.1.100.1/24 and default gateway 10.1.100.254.
b. Start the syslog server on SRV1 to monitor console messages from multiple devices.
c. Start the TFTP server on SRV1 to record device configuration changes.

Step 5: Release and renew the DHCP lease on PC-B and PC-C.

a. Ensure that PC-B is configured as a DHCP client in the OFFICE VLAN.
b. Ensure that PC-C is configured as a DHCP client in the R3 branch office LAN.
c. After loading all TT-B device configuration files, issue the ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew commands on PC-B and PC-C.

Step 6: Outline the troubleshooting approach and validation steps.

Use this space to identify your troubleshooting approach and the key steps to verify that the problem is resolved. Troubleshooting approaches to select from include the follow-the-path, perform-comparison, bottom-up, top-down, divide-and-conquer, shoot-from-the-hip, and swap-components (move-the-problem) methods.

Note: In addition to a specific approach, you can use the generic troubleshooting process: defining a problem, gathering information, analyzing the information, eliminating possible problem causes, formulating a hypothesis about the likely cause of the problem, testing that hypothesis, and solving the problem.
________________________________________________________________

Step 7: Record the troubleshooting process and configuration changes.

Use this log to document your actions and results during the troubleshooting process. List the commands you used to gather information. As you progress, record your thoughts as to what you think the problem might be and which actions you take to correct the problem.

Device Actions and Results

Step 8: Document trouble ticket debrief notes.

Use this space to make notes of the key learning points that you picked up during the discussion of this trouble ticket with the instructor. The notes can include problems encountered, solutions applied, useful commands employed, alternate solutions, methods, and processes, and procedure and communication improvements.
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________


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